Time Lapse Mining Automatically Creates Flawless Videos from Photos Found Online

Time_Lapse_Mining

Time lapse is possibly the best way to show change over time, be it the construction of a skyscraper or an otherwise unnoticeable change that occurs over a long period of time.

The problem with this popular technique is that it usually requires careful planning, a single photographer or a dedicated team and a decent amount of editing. However, a team of researchers from the University of Washington and Google seems to have overcome these difficulties.

The method used by the researchers takes advantage of the endless amount of photos found online, automatically detects popular subjects and edits them into seamless time lapse videos.

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Facebook to Support Spherical Interactive Video in News Feed

Facebook_360_Degree2

These 360-degree interactive videos are shot with up to 24 cameras at a time, allowing the viewer to change the point of view in any direction. It is much like Google Street View, except you can look up or down as well, and you do so while the video keeps playing.

The immersive videos will also be available on the Oculus Rift 3D goggles headset, made by Facebook’s recent acquisition, Oculus VR.

Despite Virtual Reality being associated mainly with gaming, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said he expects VR video to be more engaging.

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Google Earth Pro Goes Free Enabling stunning Captures and HD Movies

Google Earth

No many know this but Google Earth had a bigger brother called Google Earth Pro and while the ‘lil sibling was free, getting the pro version was $400/year. No small change.

I guess there were not too many hoppers on that offer and now Google is releasing Google Earth Pro for free (right here). That is a steep $400/year (or 100%) drop making Pro available to everyone.

What can you do with the pro version? For starters, you can export bigger images, the regular version supported only 1000×1000px photos, while the pro version enables you to dump 4800×3200px photos which should be good enough for 4K resolution.

The pro version also enables to capture HD videos of the view you are seeing on screen.

(Pro also enables batch address import and better distance measuring, but I guess that only applies to traveling photographers).

The fact that Google Earth Pro is now free does not mean you do not have to get a key but you can easily get one on the form here.

[via techcrunch]

Sony Grabs a Lytro-Esque Patent for Light Field Sensor Technology

Sony's New Patent

Lytro’s one of the few companies out there that are pioneering in what’s called “light field” technology; their light field sensors basically take in massive amounts of data and process them into a small picture that you can interact with. The final result helps achieve a sort of post-focusing effect you’d find in Google Camera’s Lens Blur or the HTC One M8’s double-sensor camera. Back about two months ago, Lytro announced a camera called the Illum – one of the first major steps in making a camera like that reality while keeping the specs a bit up to date.

But right now, the technology’s still in its growing stages. The Illum is a first, but at the same time it’s retaining a hefty price tag of around $1500. It’s needless to say that there’s still a lot left to be done with this technology before it can actually be that profitable. Just recently, Sony took a big step for the future of light field sensors by grabbing their own patent for light field sensors. According to the patent [warning, geeky read], apparently Sony has a way to get past some of the limitations that light field sensors bring to the rest of the technology implemented in. Put that together with the fact that this is Sony we’re talking about, which both has the tech power and the market interest, and you’ve got a pretty promising look at what the future might hold for these new sensors.

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Android’s Next Update Set to Bring Manual Focus, DNG, Exposure Control, and More

Android L

Earlier this month, Apple raised the bar for the iPhone’s camera when it announced iOS 8; the upcoming software is set to give iOS users features such as manual exposure, time-lapse photography, and more. With the passing of Google I/O just last week, we were introduced to Android L. After a weekend of coverage, it looks like Android’s camera is about to get a few small updates, as well…

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Google Declares War On Vertical Video

If you use an Android device (or just read photo and tech blog) there was no way to avoid hearing about Google’s blitz into the Camera app realm with their new Google Camera. The camera has many new features (like adaptive lens blur, Photo spheres and others).

Interestedly, it looks like Google also declared a war on vertical video (also known as VSS or vertical video syndrome).

When you switch into video more the camera app will provide a ‘gentle’ reminder in the form of a ‘please rotate’ icon. This icon should alert you  on the fact that you are not shooting horizontally as any educated photographer should be shooting. [Read more…]

Google Obtains Patents for the Development of Contact Lens Cameras

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Google Glass is on public sale today for one day only. And by that, I mean that the development model with software specifications assigned two years ago is on sale today. They haven’t even fully implemented their Glass technology into the world of wearable consumer technology, yet, and Google already has their mind on the next move. A patent’s just been released that details plans by the company to invent camera technology for contact lenses.

Oh, eat your hearts out, NSA. Eat your hearts out.

[Read more…]

Google Thinks That Photographers Are Not Terrorists (And That They Should Not Use Groupon)

When it comes to the question what interests the world, there is no better place to ask than Google. As the main internet hub which holds about 67% of the searches done worldwide, they know what’s on our minds.

Google Thinks That Photographers Are Not Paying Taxes (And That They Should Not Use Groupon)

Google uses this information to autocomplete any search query to what they think the world is interested in. This is how Google describes the service: “The search queries that you see as part of autocomplete are a reflection of the search activity of all web users and the content of web pages indexed by Google“.

The UN Women recently kicked a brilliant campaign showing how biased or even discriminating those algorithms may be against women, when Google autocompleted queries like “women should” with phrases like “stay at home” and be slaves.

I thought it would be interesting to try this concept on photographers and see what Google (and by extension the world) thinks on what photographers. If you made an interesting autocomplete for photographers leave it in the comments. [Read more…]