No Budget For A Drone? Put Your GoPro On A Kite Instead

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If you’ve never heard of the method being used before, attaching your camera to a kite may sound kind of sketchy at first, but the aerial photography technique has actually been around since the late 1800’s. In 1912, a french inventor by the name of Pierre Picavet invented the Picavet suspension, which allowed photographers to mount cameras to balloons and kites while providing leveling to the camera as it flew through the air.

Though the art of kite aerial photography has mostly gone to the wayside, there’s still a devoted group of enthusiasts out there that are keeping the hobby alive. Once of them being YouTube user, QueDecree. In the video clip below, the Australian kite aerial photographer shows you how to get your kite and camera up in the air, and also shares some pointers on assembling the rig.  [Read more…]

Photographer Crafts Elaborate and Funny Photo Sets From Paper

adriana-napolitano-11There is absolutely nothing that says you have to stop playing with paper and scissors when you become an adult. I mean, heck, you can now legally buy your own scissors, so why not!

Adriana Napolitano is pretty much the Edward Scissorhands of set design. “I started to create sets for stop motion videos,” she says. “I always loved to create stuff with my hands. I think it’s a family thing.” But, regardless of her genetic predisposition, Adriana truly has a natural talent for creative flare. So, when her boyfriend, who is a photographer, started teaching her more about lighting and how to best capture her projects, she set about developing a portraits series with elaborate props and costumes – all made out of paper.
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Turn an old, silk scarf into a stylish camera strap

diy-scarf-camera-strapI’m always looking to accessorize to compliment my beard, from the hats I wear to…well, that’s pretty much the extent of it. While this DIY project isn’t perhaps something I would personally dangle around my manly neck, I think it’s awesome and would make a great handmade gift for the female photographer in your life.

Photographer, camera bag designer, and semi-pro crocodile wrestler (she’s from Australia…we made assumptions) Emma Anderson recently posted a tutorial on repurposing an old, silk scarf into a stylish and gorgeous camera strap. (Just because I wouldn’t wear it doesn’t mean I can’t like it, right?)

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Build a cheap, durable leather belt camera strap

leather-belt-camera-strap-01I love cameras. I love leather (take that however you wish). And, while I don’t love camera straps, I kinda dig this DIY leather belt strap from green-liver and photo enthusiast Tyler Lloyd. (We assume he devised the idea one night as he was twirling his mustache by a crackling fireplace and sharpening his straight razor on a leather strop.)

The project itself is rather simple, requiring minimal tools and materials. So, let’s take a look at what eating raw vegetables will lead a man to build.

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Capture Every Lightning Strike with This Clever GoPro Hack

lightning-strike-gopro-result-stillIn the past, we’ve featured some great posts about making sure you capture those epic lightning strikes that frolic through the sky like hyperactive children – like this one. (It’s okay…I’ll wait while you check it out. Maybe grab some KFC on your way back?)

Photographer and photo-hacker (can we just shorten it to “phacker,” already?!) Saulius Lukse recently published a post detailing how, using a GoPro and Python script, you can not only capture a whole string of lightning strikes but isolate the individual frames as well.

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Capture and Transmit Photos Remotely with a Solar-Powered Camera and Radio

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There are few things that get me more excited than radio technology (…at least for the time being; I will probably find another obsession in a month or two). Add to that off-grid power and photography, and you’ve got my attention.

This creative setup uses a Raspberry Pi, some extra wires, a BaoFeng UHF/VHF handheld radio (have a couple of them myself and love ’em), and some scripting to capture images, convert them to radio waves, and transmit them via slow-scan television (SSTV) to a remote location…all run off solar power.

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Quickly digitize the Dark Age with this DIY Automatic Film Slide Scanner

For those alive (or with family alive) during the days of film cameras, you have probably encountered the phenomenon of film slides (considered by some to be the precursor to PowerPoint, but Bill Gates refused to comment on where he originally came up with the idea). The problem with them, however, is moving them over into the digital era.

That is where photographer and DIY-er Stefan Lindgren took it upon himself to build a more-affordable alternative to the SlideSnap Pro, which weighs in at a hefty $3,395. (Heck, I don’t even spend that much on a car!)

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DIY 7,500 Lumens 100W LED Flashlight That Only Costs About $10 To Build

Ready for the latest installment of a DIY lighting project? Assuming you have a couple 18V Nickel Cadmium power tool batteries laying around, as I suspect many of you DIYers do, you can build this powerful flashlight on the cheap. Plus, aside from being  inexpensive to build and it’s also surprisingly simple to make.

Take a look at the video to see how it’s done:

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Creating Realistic Looking Clouds With A Fog Machine And Water

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A few years back, we shared this tutorial on how to make some DIY clouds to use as props in your photos. It’s still a great tutorial, and certainly a much longer lasting way to make clouds than the method we’re about to show you, so remember to check it out when we’re done over here. But, first, discover the work of Berndnaut Smilde, a dutch artist who has truly perfected the science of DIY cloud making.

As the image above suggests, Smilde’s clouds are quite realistic and are made using a fog machine, water, and ingenuity. You’ve probably figured out by now these clouds are also very temporary, often only lingering just long enough to make a photo before they drift away. [Read more…]

Build this DIY ‘Itsy Bitsy Camera Slider’ for Free!

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UPDATE: We’ve been approached by Igus and, as always, there’s good news and there’s bad news. The bad news – please don’t send additional requests for free samples. As you may imagine, these are meant for potential buyers in industrial markets and shipping samples out for us to build sliders is simply not a sustainable business for them. The good news – the kind people at Igus are working on a plan to fulfill the requests that have already been made.

For more info dedicated Igus gear, check out this review of the Igus slider.

Many sliders on the market are made of the Igus DryLin system and thanks to the free samples available from the company, you can build a 10-inch slider for free (or dirt cheap).

The slider might be small, but it’s long enough to add a short sliding motion to your videos. Plus, you will have a hard time finding anything remotely close to the quality of this slider at the same price point.

Hurry, this option might be time-limited!

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