Steve McCurry Recounts His Experience Photographing The 9/11 Tragedy

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Photo by Steve McCurry

In a recent interview conducted by Sky Arte, iconic photojournalist, Steve McCurry, recounts his experience photographing the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. McCurry shared the interview online today, the 13th anniversary of the attacks.

The photographer was in New York City in an apartment within eyesight of the towers when the attacks happened, an experience which he delves into with a heavy heart during 30-minute video clip below. The documentary style interview also affords McCurry a chance to talk about his other works, including Afghan Girl, one of his most well known works. [Read more...]

Why Has The Falling Man – One Of The Strongest Photographs in History Disappeared [strong graphics]

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The Falling Man / Associated Press / Richard Drew

Some dates are defining dates and everyone remembers where they have been on those date. One such date is 9/11. If I asked you where you were on that day you’d probably remember. One of the photographs most associated with that day is The Falling Man. Interestingly, despite the strength of the photo is has almost disappeared from the news shortly after it was published. Here is some context about the photo:

The Falling Man is a photograph taken by Associated Press photographer Richard Drew of a man falling from the North Tower of the World Trade Center at 9:41:15 a.m. during the September 11 attacks in New York City. The subject of the image, whose identity remains uncertain, was one of the people trapped on the upper floors of the skyscraper who either fell searching for safety or jumped to escape the fire and smoke.

With the opening of the 9/11 Memorial in Manhattan, the Design Observer ran an interview with Henry Singer who directed a documentary about this photograph back in 2006It tells the story of this controversial image: who took it; how it was first published and censored; the responses of the families, and the search to discover the identity of the man in the photograph. [Read more...]

This Ten-Year Timelapse of the 9/11 Memorial Gives Us a Powerful Reminder

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I was born and raised a Muslim in America, and nine years old when New York lost its Twin Towers. The next week, I started finding out that the men responsible for hijacking the four airplanes that marked that terrible day did it in the name of my religion. What happened that day changed the course of the entire country; for me, that change came in the form of prejudice, fear, and hate. For a while, many people close to me dealt with threats, harassment, and misunderstandings because people were scared. It was extraordinary how different things had become in such a short time.

But the way things have changed up to now is even more remarkable. Today, even in Texas, that fear is dying. The people that live here build together, work together, and learn about each other in ways that are unprecedented. Granted, I can’t speak for other areas out there, but I’ve never seen Muslims so accepted into a community as I do today, and every now and then I find myself thankful for that. It’s a reminder of the endurance we’re all capable of; it’s a reminder of the fact that even when the loss we might face is overwhelming, our will to rebuild is what remains resilient. The 9/11 Memorial Museum and One World Trade Center that stand in New York today are living examples of that strength.

[Read more...]