How to Take Pictures of Sound Waves with $9 and your Camera

A couple of months ago, I wrote a post going over Schilieron Flow Visualization, a method used to detect and visualize waves emitted from sound. NPR gave us a detailed and incredibly informative look into how it was all done.

Now, it looks like there’s a way to capture those waves through a lens yourself. A user on Instructables named jlansey recently put up a tutorial going over how you can make your own setup on a $9 budget (…assuming you already have a camera, of course).

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How To Become A Wedding Photographer In 10 Easy Steps – Photographers Hate This

Starting a career as a wedding photographer is EASY – all you have to do is follow these 10 EASY STEPS TO BECOME A WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHER!

If you have ever wanted to start a fun, glamorous and profitable ($$$$!!!) career as a wedding photographer, I will share the secret to success that professional wedding photographers don’t want you to know.

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The best part is that you don’t even need to know how to use a camera – or even have a camera to get started!

And you can learn it all FOR FREE – just read the rest of this article (and then be sure to buy our eBook*)!!! [Read more...]

Building A Large Format Digital Camera

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it is not often that a person builds their own camera, and even less common for them to build a large format camera, but Jimmy.c. Alzen just built one of those. The total cost of the build was less than $150 + several years of education and tinkering know-how.

The camera was submitted to Hack a day’s Challenge and as such it is pretty hacked up. The photographs that it takes, though, are dreamy. [Read more...]

Murphy’s Laws of Photography

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Murphy’s Law: The inexplicable phenomenon of a fickle, spiteful universe which ensures that whatever can go wrong will go wrong. Let’s also not forget its well-known corollary: The higher the stakes, the greater the fall. Nobody seems to have a truly definitive handle on the history of the term, although its sentiment was expressed in print long before Murphy’s name was attached to it some time around 1952. What I think we can all agree on, though, is that when Murphy comes for you you’re screwed. Plain and simple.

Yeah…I’m in that kind of mood.

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Nikon Bans Film in its Annual Photography contest… Again.

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The Nikon Photo Contest has been running annually since 1969. Even with roots that go back, however, the company isn’t afraid to move on and not look back. With the announcement for this year’s contest also came news that Nikon is banning film photography again.

That’s right. Again. I’d tell you that there’s old vintage Nikon cameras out there right now going “Et tu, Brute?” to the news, but apparently the company’s had this rule for a while now in the contest’s past few yearly runs; there’s absolutely no scans of film pictures allowed in entry.

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7 DIY Photography Tips Using Household Objects

Photography can be expensive! So, it’s lovely to come across cool tips for using every day, household objects in your photography which can both help reduce the price of creating cool images or even help protect your gear.

Markus Berger and the team over at the COOPH YouTube channel has just released a new video featuring seven very cool little tips (and a bonus one at the end) doing just that: it shows simple, every day objects, used to great effect. More than one of these I had never thought of, so it’s well worth checking out these DIY hints used in effect. Read more below the jump.

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DIYP Interviews Robert Cianflone, World Cup Soccer Photographer

The World Cup has been thrilling so far. Despite the Australians bowing out early with three straight losses, I have loved every minute I have seen as the world’s best compete. With just four games to go, the excitement is high as the world wonders if Brazil could achieve a World Cup victory at home.

There has been incredible goal after incredible goal. And on the sidelines there has been a team of photographers specialising in sports and football photography capturing every moment for the world’s press.

Robert Cianflone capturing locals playing soccer.

Robert Cianflone, a Getty Images photographer, is one of those photographers. In 2014 alone, I have followed his Instagram account with awe has he covered both the Olympics in Russia and now the World Cup in Brazil. I was curious about what it is like to be covering the World Cup, so I reached out to him to get some answers. [Read more...]

Let Me Know When You See Fire: What a Video Shot at 1000 FPS Looks Like in 4K

Whether we may think it’s excessive or not, 4K is slowly starting to become the next standard in video. It makes me think of a criticism I once heard against digital filmmaking: that it becomes too real for the viewer to suspend disbelief. Growing up, many of us have been used to movies being shot on 24 FPS film; in a way, it allows us to “escape” the real world and watch a story set in a fantasy world. The blurs, light leaks, and contrast burns – every imperfection from that film – separates the world of the movie from the reality of the world in which we reside.

Fast-forward to today’s time, and you have the Hobbit films being released in 48 FPS across theaters worldwide. When Peter Jackson filmed the trilogy, he described watching the final result as looking through a window. The problem is that many people don’t want to view movies in a world that real.

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How To Improve The Function Of The Fuji X-T1 For Faster Focusing

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Photographer Eivind Rohne is a happy Fuji X1 shooter, but ever the greatest of cameras can use a small push to make it perfect.

Eivind shares that one of the most used functions on his Fuji X1 is the back panel direction buttons which he uses to move the focus point. He does that by assigning the front custom button to activate focus point selection.

While was almost perfect, Eivind made it even more perfect by adding a bit of Sugru to the camera:

When I shoot, I move the focus point around a lot. So on the X-T1 I’ve assigned the function to activate focus point selection to the front custom button. Then I can press it with my middle finger, and move the focus point with my thumb on the four buttons around the OK button. But I want to do this without having to take the camera from my eye to see which button I’m pressing.

So to work more efficiently with the camera, I rolled thin stripes of Sugru and applied to all four buttons around the OK button. I also put a small dot of Sugru on the front function button, the Focus Assist button, and on the AF-L button. Why not the AE-L button you might wonder? Because with only a dot on one of those two, I immediately know where on the back of the camera my finger is without having to look. And I chose red because it looked color than black.

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5 Reasons You Should Own At Least One Prime Lens

If you’ve just made the move from smartphone or point and shoot to a DSLR body, you should now be considering the lenses you use. You have gotten the kit lens along with the camera and wanting another lens for variety, or you are looking to improve the technical quality of your photos. Toby Gelston (aka CameraRec Toby) suggests that at least one of the lenses in your arsenal should be a prime lens.

Prime lenses are lenses with a single focal length (e.g. 50mm, 85mm and so on). While Toby lists 5 reasons for using a prime lens – Bokeh quality; get more light; quality; value for money & size – I think Toby is only scratching the surface with the reasons to go prime. Do you own a prime lens?

[5 Reasons you should own a prime lens via picture correctPetaPixel]