Revisiting Shinichi Maruyama’s “Nude”; 10,000 Photos Of Nude Dancers Composited Into One

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A well made photograph never gets boring to look at. As proven by the images that make up Shinichi Maruyama’s Nude series, which features gorgeous photographs of nude dancers. The photographs, however, are not your average studio shot and that beautiful display of the dancers motion wasn’t captured using long exposure techniques as you might suspect. Rather, Maruyama photographed the dancers using frame rates near 2,000 frames per second. In total, each individual image you see is actually made up of about 10,000 frames that were composited together during post production. [Read more...]

Wedding Photography Prices: ON or OFF Your Website?

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It’s the age-old question, should a wedding photographer put his/her prices on the website, or leave them off? I’ve asked myself this, and seen many photographers ask the same thing. Lots of opinions, some of them very strong opinions, but no one seems to back it up with actual data.

An argument I’ve heard for putting prices online is that the potential client wants to know if you’re within her price range. If you make it too difficult to find that information, she won’t bother to contact you because there are plenty of other photographers to look at. Would you go look at a new car if they wouldn’t tell you the price until you got to the dealership?

The counter-argument is that wedding photography can be expensive, clients don’t always have an understanding of how much they should expect to spend, and placing too much emphasis on price means that the client misses out on less-tangible benefits that the photographer has to offer. If you make the client ask for pricing, you can then strike up a dialog with the client and build a relationship before getting icky with numbers.

Both arguments seem reasonable. And those photographers who can’t make up their minds usually wimp out and put a “starting at $xxxxx” on their site! (That’s what I do currently. :) )

But I’ve got some Actual Data!

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Shared a Night-Time Photo Of The Eiffel Tower? You Are Breaking The Law

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One of the most iconic places to visit in France (and in Paris in particular) is the Eiffel tower. And while anyone is free to take its photos by day or night, sharing a photo of the light-show that the tower is engulfed in is pretty much infringing on the copyright of the show.

torrentfreak aims a spot light on this weird copyright situation by explaining that some architecture and some landmarks are copyrighted.

Actually, the Eiffel tower official website states this pretty clearly:

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Parachute Wraps Around Gopro, Skydiver Calmly Untangles It And Moves On

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A lot has been said about the dangers of skydiving with a camera attached to one’s helmet. The bonus of awesome footage comes with the risk of having a weird pong camera mount sticking out of your helmet. And while most of the time the camera will provide some sweet memories there are occasions where it can put you in a life threatening situation.

There is not much info about the footage below. But it clearly shows the dangers of using a GoPro Helmet Mount while skydiving. One of the divers had his bridle tangled in another diver’s GoPro camera (bridle is part of the parachute extraction mechanism).

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The Case for Field Monitors

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I’m a convert.

Not to any particular religion, but instead to the idea that a field monitor is the most important piece of equipment you can have on a video shoot after the camera, a lens and some kind of support.

This represents a sea change in my worldview. As a still photographer for decades, until recently I thought the bane of my video production existence was audio. But a Zoom H4n, a shotgun, a couple of lavs and a wireless system later, I’ve changed my mind.

And that’s because while I took for granted my ability to obtain tack-sharp focus every time, I’ve learned the hard way once again that assumptions are the mother of all screw-ups.

Turns out it was easier to focus in the good old days of film, manual lenses, split image rangefinders, and coarse microprisms on ground glass than it is today through on-board electronic viewfinders (EVFs) and LCDs.

There’s a reason why third party EVF’s and monitors are so popular.

I recently had the opportunity to review a 7.7” diagonal field monitor, and it was a revelation (no religious undercurrent intended).

Why?

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How To Build A DIY Eyelighter

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I’m always looking to add new light modifiers to my home studio but name brand products are often too expensive. I still cannot justifies a big expense for a single look so $300 for the Wescott Eyelighter was not a reasonable purchase for me. Plus looking at the components I felt it could be made for pennies on the dollar, look almost as nice and most importantly give me similar results. Being the handy man type I’m prone to DIY just about anything and as long as my wife doesn’t complain about the look or build quality. She’s happy, I’m happy; such is life. And since I’m the spender in this family keeping her happy is my path to more gear.

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Astronauts Aboard The ISS Immerse A GoPro Into A Floating Sphere Of Water

nasa-goproThis is proof that astronauts are just the best. The team aboard the International Space Station decided to kill some time by releasing a large ball of water into the spacecraft and sticking a GoPro inside it. Because they are in space, the surface tension of the water caused it to take on a spherical shape, allowing enough room for the action camera to fit inside as it floated around in the cabin. There’s also some really cool footage of the astronauts attempting to handle the sphere. Their reaction to the experience is almost as fun to watch as the GoPro water ball itself.

As further proof that astraunts rule, NASA even filmed the entire thing in 3D for our ultimate viewing pleasure (so long as you have the appropriate 3D eyewear to make it work). But, even if you don’t have 3D glasses, the 2D version is pretty rad, too. Take a look at the awesome footage, below. It certainly puts a whole new perspective on underwater photography. [Read more...]

3D Printed Images Offer The Blind An Opportunity To Experience Photography

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The Touchable Memories project, which is being spearheaded by 3D printer manufacturer, Pirate 3D, is bringing photography into the lives of individuals who have either lost their eyesight or were born blind. Using the Buccaneer 3D printer, Pirate 3D are able to print dimensional photographs from the participants past, giving them a tangible way to revisit their memories.

You can watch a heartwarming video on the project (below) to witness the first time the participants were able to experience a 3D printed photograph, including the story of one man who was once again able to work as a director of photography on a film for the first time since losing his eyesight over eight years ago. [Read more...]

Is Depth Of Field Affected By Focal Length? A Practical Test

The fact that the depth of field varies depending on focal length seems pretty straightforward, doesn’t it? Matt Granger however says that wide angle lenses don’t necessarily have a smaller depth of field when compared to longer telephoto lenses:

To understand any of this, you have to know what depth of field is: (Yes, this is very basic) Depth of field is basically the depth of your image that is in sharp focus, it is usually about 1/3 in front of your focus and 2/3 behind it.

In his video, Matt conducts a test to prove his point: He takes the same shot with the same framing and only changes the focal length and the position of the camera. The aperture was kept the same – f/2.8 – throughout the shoot. Of course when changing the focal length of your lens you’ll have to physically move the camera if you want your final result to have the same crop.

Here are the results:

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