Magic Lantern: Canon 5DmkIII Raw Recording Up To 3592X1320 + Double Buffering

Yesterday we shared that the Magic Lantern team managed to pull a RAW HD stream from the Canon 5DmkIII and today EOSHD shares some hands on with this mode achieving good quality 2.5K (2880 x 1320) and even 3.6K (albeit with some frames dropped).

Magic Lantern: Canon 5DmkIII Raw Recording Up To 3592X1320 + Double Buffering

This is in addition to a new announcement on the ML facebook page, where they share that they implemented double buffering on RAW for the mkII and mkIII.

This double buffering will reduce screen tearing on shot footage.

Screen tearing is “glitch” that shows up when two frames are mashed up in a video stream. An artifact that ML’s double buffering seems to reduce.

A few videos and more info after the jump. [Read more…]

Magic Lantern Pulls RAW Video at 24FPS From Canon’s 5D mkIII

Here are some great news to start off the week. The team at Magic Lantern – Canon’s unsupported firmware just shared an interesting bit of information. They were able to use the firmware to pull uncompressed RAW video from Canon’s 5DmkIII.

Magic Lantern Pulls RAW Video at 24FPS From Canon's 5D mkIII

Usually, the video that’s coming out of the 5D is a compressed H.264 stream which both reduces the resolution and the dynamic range of the data coming from the sensor. But the RAW video provide more resolution and more dynamic rage, just like a RAW file provide those over a jpg file. [Read more…]

Introduction To Tethered Shooting

Tethered shooting is connecting a computer to the camera when you shoot so the pictures you take a downloaded to the computer rather than (or in addition) to a memory card.

Usually, the camera and computer are connected by cable, hence tethering.

In this tutorial, I am going to go over tethered shooting, why (or when) you should shoot tethered, how it is done and what is the gear involved.

Introduction To Tethered Shooting

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2,000 Water Drops Were Used To Create This In-Drop Animation

While this short movie looks like was taken inside a single drop of water, it was actually taken with 2,000 distinct drops each carefully shot in a slightly different location with a slightly different background.

2,000 Water Drops Were Used To Create This In-Drop Animation

Physalia Studio created Entropy – this stop motion – high speed hybrid as a logo animation for IdN magazine. It shows a droplet falling while a card is placed behind it and lit. 320 different cards were rendered and then printed. and as the drop fell to create the animation. This is how you do it for one drop. Imagine 2,000. [Read more…]

Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo Possibly The First Movie To Use Computer Animation

Vertigo, Hitchcock’s 1958 classic just celebrated its 55th anniversary and rhizome released an interesting bit of information about the movie.

Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo Possibly The First Movie To Use Computer Animation

As with the other “late” Hitchcock movies, the opening sequences (designed by Saul Bass) correspond with motifs from the movie itself. For Vertigo there is a strong spiral element in the opening sequence, spirals that correspond to the staircase that triggers Scottie’s Vertigo. [Read more…]

Bullet Time Rig Made With a Ceiling Fan

Back in 1999 the Wachowskis and Keanu Reeves introduced a something new with The Matrix – Bullet time effect. The idea was to show the time flow from a bullet perspective. Since time is relative, bullets moving in mundane speeds meant everything else really slows down. This trick allowed Reeves to dodge bullets, and to ponder about the existence of spoons.

Bullet Time Rig Made With a Ceiling Fan

In the matrix the effect is achieved with tens of cameras shooting in succession or simultaneously, and in the final edit a sequence is made by grabbing a frame from each camera. Even today making a full 360 bullet time can be really expensive.

but for smaller objects Mark Rober found a way to spin a camera really fast to get a similar effect. Mark hooked a rig to a ceiling fan using its high speed rotation for swift camera placement. A set of lights was placed on the rig so they are stationary in relation to the camera. the last ingredient was a  GoPro Black set to shoot 240fps slow-mo. Mark was able to capture some amazing bullet time footage. [Read more…]

Quick Tip: Using USB Outlets For Accessory Charging

How many of your devices are charged via USB? Probably your at least a smartphone, maybe a tablet, a GoPro, remotes, audio gear and the list goes on. Each of those devices have their own charger that most likely connects to a USB cable or ends with a micro USB connection.

Quick Tip: Using USB Outlets For Accessory Charging

Photographer JP Danko sent in this great tip about using a wall socket with an integrated USB charger. JP suggests using a Leviton T5630-W 2.1-Amp USB Charger but there are other brands out there. Here is JP’s plan: [Read more…]

The “Nice Shot” Comment Myth

The "Nice Shot" Comment Myth

Don’t Let The Comment Haters Slow You Down

Most people appreciate and maybe even crave feedback, especially positive. When it comes to photography, there are those who are very comfortable providing constructive, well crafted critiques. These paragraphs of personal opinions are often (at least hopefully, always) provided with the best intentions in mind, to help the photographer understand what works, and what doesn’t, in a particular photograph.

But there has been a growing trend of fellow photographers withholding their positive encouragement for the most silly of reasons: embarrassment and shame.
[Read more…]