The Light Blaster Is A Reality Altering Strobe Based Projector

We are very excited today to announce a brand new light modifier done by our sister company – Spiffy Gear. It is called The Light Blaster™.

The Light Blaster (or Blaster for short) is a unique light modifier that enables you to project an image onto a subject or a background. Imagine that, the ability to create a new world at the click of a shutter.

The Light Blaster Is A Reality Altering Strobe Based Projector

It is small, portable and and only requires a speedlight and any SLR lens to work. Things you already probably have. We’ve designed a high quality product specifically built to keep costs at a minimum while pushing the creative potential to the maximum! The advantage of having an interchangeable lens means that you can simply switch up the focal length to achieve different results: 35mm to blast an entire wall, 200mm to paint a heart on a chest.

Here is where you get one, right here!

The Blaster has a a specific groove for good ol’ 35mm framed slides, but it can also accept unframed slides (or negatives) and home printed transparencies cut to specific sizes (you can download a template on the site), and pre-printed transparencies. This opens up a pretty wide variety of creative applications, from using old slides as backdrops, to projecting specific images on models and objects.

Enough words, check out the blaster in action for yourself:

This movie by Benjamin Von Wong explains the concept (and there are more movies in the gallery):

And on a totally different mood, a more romantic shoot, telling a reminiscent story by Jill Rosell

The basic unit for Canon sells for $99 and for Nikon lenses you can buy an additional adapter. You can also buy a Pistol Grip if you think you can get away with wondering the streets and “helping” photographers add a bit of drama to their photos.

Here are some more photographs taken with the Blaster:

The Light Blaster Is A Reality Altering Strobe Based Projector

The Light Blaster Is A Reality Altering Strobe Based Projector

The Light Blaster Is A Reality Altering Strobe Based Projector

The Light Blaster Is A Reality Altering Strobe Based Projector

And here are some more photos of the Blaster

The Light Blaster Is A Reality Altering Strobe Based Projector

The Light Blaster Is A Reality Altering Strobe Based Projector

The Light Blaster Is A Reality Altering Strobe Based Projector

I’ll probably be sharing more videos and images over the next few days.

[The Light Blaster | $99]

  • Ikke

    Already someone who has a home made one of those??? I wish I could make it!!!

    • Jayson Carey
      • http://www.julian-h.de/ Julian

        jason, i wanted to post the same. julius did it first :)

        • http://www.vonwong.com/ Benjamin Von Wong

          lol but for 99$, totally worth it to skip on the trouble of building one lol

          • Ikke

            If you have the money in your pocket. :-D

            Thanks Jayson and Julian, I’m gonna try it! With that ‘schedule’ I can simplefy it a bit. :-P

          • Rick

            Ikke, with a small box and a rear lens cap you’re willing to cut a hole in to use as a mount, this project is a piece of cake and can be done for a couple $$. Just remember to set your image slide off the back of the lens the same distance as the image plane in a camera.

          • david d

            Or, just pick up an old film camera body, remove the back cover and use it to hold and register the film.

            The added benefit of using an old body would be that the view finder can be used to aim and focus where the projected image will go. If it’s an old mechanical body, just use a cable release and the bulb setting to hold the shutter open while projecting is desired.

          • Jayson Carey

            $99 for essentially just two pieces of plastic screwed together? that’s double the cost of the flash i’d be putting in it. no thanks.

          • Jayson Carey

            This is also “DIYPhotography.com” saying ‘just buy it’ defeats the purpose of DIY.

          • http://www.diyphotography.net/ udi tirosh

            we’re diyphotography.net :) diyphotography.com are other guys ;)

          • Jayson Carey

            haha oops! i just put it in my bookmarks after my first visit and haven’t typed it since!

          • http://www.diyphotography.net/ udi tirosh

            happy to be bookmarked :)

  • Kay O. Sweaver

    Awesome! I was also planning a DIY of this but might just pony up the cash and save myself the bother.

  • Patrick

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=EAX_3Bgel7M#at=19
    this was done originally with an adapted camera, see the video on youtube.

  • Greg Easton

    Wow. A surcharge because I shoot Nikon? That’s a slap in the face. I’ll go make my own.

    • http://www.diyphotography.net/ udi tirosh

      Greg, great to see you.

      we had to take a decision on the bio-net, and Canon have the best Flange focal distance, which means that you can move form canon to anything. So Canon was selected as base (you can see more here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flange_focal_distance)

      Anyhow, if you make one yourself I would be glad to feature it here if you so wish.

  • Diogene

    Hi, Julius Von Bismarck invented the “Image Fulgurator”, same as this device ! Follow this link : http://www.juliusvonbismarck.com/bank/index.php?/projects/fulgurator-idee/

    • KDS

      Hmm, no response to that. I was wondering about the same thing, as that Fulgurator patent is from 2007/2008

  • http://www.robertlowdon.com/ Robert Lowdon

    Is it possible to get just an adapter to attach the lens to concentrate the light better?

    • Rick

      The spread of the image is a function of the focal length of the lens. Longer lens = more concentrated image.

  • Jason G

    how about an old slide projector? that’s basicallywhat this thing is, right?

    • Rick

      No, a slide projector provides constant light whereas this only provides a pulse of light.

      • Jason G

        whats the difference, constant or pulse? the outcome will be the same.

        • Rick

          Not necessarily. With the flash, you can get a stronger image and better lighting control of the scene due to the potential for a brighter pulse, a brightness which if sustained by a projector would burn a hole in your slide. With a projector however, you can more easily pose the model into the scene thus giving you more control over the visual outcome but you are far more at the mercy of the ambient light of the scene.

  • wanzewurld

    FWIW, and I realize this may be a bit picky – you misspelled “variety” (veraity) and “specific” (spesific) in the paragraph beginning with “The Blaster has a a specific groove”. I would have responded privately but didn’t see any contact information. I’m very interested in purchasing this unit despite its apparent overpricing; I have no idea how much effort, planning, and materials went into it’s constriction but I can visualize how having it could be repaid fairly quickly. The one question I have is how it attaches to the flash? Kudos on the concept which seems to combine utility, portability, novelty, and versatility. … Wayne.

    • http://www.diyphotography.net/ udi tirosh

      Thanks for watching my back, Wayne. I removed those hideous spelling mistakes.

      The strobe attached via a non-slip Velcro strap on the back, so you plug it in, and tighten the strap.

  • xaci68

    I’ve just got it yesterday and I’ve tried in the studio. Looks I have some problems in managing the light: of course I got great shots using just the blaster, but as soon as I turn on the studio flash … well… the background disappear if I use the proper light for the model :(
    I guess it’ll be a long learning curve or, I probably need less powerful flash (after all It’s only a 7x5m room

    • http://www.diyphotography.net/ udi tirosh

      Hi,

      Glad you got your Blaster alright and great to hear it is working well for you.

      As far as the studio strobe, it is a case of light-vs-light :) and obviously the studio strobe wins :)

      You could try flagging it from hitting the backdrop or using a snoot, a grid or a gridded softbox on the studio strobe so the light coming from it does not “contaminate” the backdrop.

      There are some good diagrams here: http://www.vonwong.com/blog/lightblaster/

  • xaci68

    Thanks Udi for the quick reply and yes I, of course, figured it out :)
    I already ordered the grid for the softboxes and I’ll give it another try. I’m optimistic by nature :D

    • http://www.diyphotography.net/ udi tirosh

      totally my pleasure!

    • http://www.diyphotography.net/ udi tirosh

      I would love to see what you come up with.

      • xaci68

        Of course I will :)
        But it’ll take a little while, ’cause in few days I’m travelling out of the country for a month or so :(
        therefore, I’ll be able to test it only then. But I’m sure I’ll remember to sent you something :)

  • xseven

    How about using the lens from a short throw projector (a faulty one! :) and adapt it for a studio strobe? What I don’t know is the exact placement of the slides … anyone skilled enough to calculate? :)