How To Correct The Green Cast From A 10 Stops Neutral Density Welding Glass Filter

One of my all-time long exposure photographers is Australian photographer Alex Wise. (not sure if you can say “long exposure photographer”, but I just did.

He usually shoots with uber-strong-high-end B+W 110 or Hoya ND400 ND filters, but recently he took a 10 stops welding glass (around $10 on Amazon) and swapped his high-end glass for cheap working-level welding glass.

How To Correct The Green Cast From A 10 Stops Neutral Density Welding Glass Filter

Unsurprisingly results were pretty good, and Alex shares a few tips on shooting a daytime exposure with those filters and how to correctly post process them.

This basic video shows how easy it is to correct for the notorious green cast.

There are many good tips on the post, but here is the one that specifically caught my eye:

Ignore photography purists who will tell you that using welding glass is a terrible idea as you will lose sharpness, have issues with flare and the like. I disagree. If you take a close look at this crop I have of two edited images which are both un-sharpened you can see for yourself that there is negligible difference between the two.” [Click the image for 100%, 6MB view]

How To Correct The Green Cast From A 10 Stops Neutral Density Welding Glass Filter

Head over to Alex’s blog for more great tips on this technique.

  • http://www.observingtime.com/ agour

    Nice idea, I’m definitely going to try this one out!
    In the UK, you can pickup welding glass on ebay.. for £1.20 delivered!

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_trksid=p5197.m570.l1313.TR0.TRC0.Xwelding+glass.TRS0&_nkw=welding+glass&_sacat=0&_from=R40

  • JT

    Wow. Just wow. Who knew that taking the green hue out of the image would take the green out of the image?

    • http://www.alexwisephotography.net/ Alex Wise

      Don’t forget that everyone has to start somewhere.

  • http://www.alexwisephotography.net/ Alex Wise

    Thanks for the plug Udi. Always appreciate your support over the years.

    Keep up the great work :)

  • Rick Scheibner

    Interestingly, the B+W 110 has the opposite problem: It adds magenta to the image, although not as pronounced as the welding glass here adds green.

  • David O’Sullivan

    You can also take a flash photo of a white wall and use that to set the custom WB in camera. Just set your flash at full power, wb on flash, focus on infinity use about 1/50th f4. you will get a green image. go into your menu and select that image to base the custom WB on.
    It won’t be perfect but it makes it much easier to compose and check exposure when out shooting.