Learn How To Make A Cinemagraph Using Photoshop In Under Two Minutes

cinemagraph

Make moving photos in minutes with this quick tutorial.

Have some cool b-roll laying around that you’ve been wanting to something with? In this sweet, but short video tutorial by Howard Pinsky, we learn how to turn video footage into a cinemagraph or “moving photo” fairly easily using Adobe Photoshop.

In Pinsky’s example, he has footage of traffic moving down a busy road that’s full of bright, flashing signs and advertisements. To make the  signage less distracting, Pinsky uses a mask to “freeze” the blinking lights, resulting in an image in which only the movement of the cars is visible. Take a look at the video, then read on for a breakdown of the steps. [Read more...]

Hiring An Assistant Without Jeopardizing Your Business

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Sooner or later, most of us photographers find ourselves in need of an extra set of hands or feet for a particular project, whether it’s a second shooter (no JFK jokes, please) at a wedding, managing gear and lighting on a commercial shoot, or stabilizing the flower balanced on top of a rocking horse sitting inside an adorable bathtub for that oh-so-cute newborn shoot. Most new photographers and sole proprietors, myself included on numerous occasions in the past, think nothing of pulling in a friend or relative to help out in their time of need. And while that may be fine for personal projects, having that modus operandi in your business can get you into some hot water. I’m not talking about how nice it is to have someone to share the work or how cool it is to refer to someone as “my assistant” (which, admittedly, is pretty awesome…until they break something); I’m talking about, when you DO pull someone else in to help out, making sure that all legal ramifications are met and you do not sign your business’ death warrant.

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Your Aperture Is Sort Of Lying To You: When Is An Aperture Of F1.2 Not Actually A F1.2?

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When Is An Aperture Of F1.2 Not Actually A F1.2? By the time the light gets to your sensor, that’s when.

One of the first things we learn as photographers are F stops and how we can use them to properly expose a photograph, but there is also such a thing as T stops and we don’t always give them the attention they deserve. Of course, a T-stop may not be essential knowledge on every photo you take, but understanding what a T stop is will give you a better understanding of light, which is never a bad thing for a photographer to have. (It’s also helpful information to have in your bag if you’re going to be lens shopping soon!). And Matt Granger does an amazing job of explaining the difference.

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Quick Tip: Photographing a Reluctant Subject? Shoot From The Hip (Or From The Ear)

This has happened to me countless times and I wish I knew this tip back in the days when I was starting out. James Madelin (the ‘Orbis‘ guy) and Matt Granger (Get You Gear Out) just shared this incredibly simple, but useful tip on shooting shy people.

James’s tip shares a tip from his photojournalism days where he had to shoot people that didn’t really want to be photographed. His first tip is to shoot from the hip (which is kinda common knowledge), but it was his second tip that threw me off. Shooting people with the camera set against your ear while talking to them. They see the camera, they hear the clicks, they know they are being photographed, but somehow the fact that the glass is not standing between you and them makes them easier about the whole experience. The benefit of shooting from the ear over shooting from the heap is that you are shooting at eye-level and that you engage with your subject.

Now, of course, I would not recommend this for anything but photojournalism, as it may raise privacy issues, or start a small riot, but if you must get a frame for a paper, this could save your day.

[Photographing a reluctant subject | Matt Granger, James Madelin]

How To Photograph A Wedding With One Photographer, One Camera, One Lens and One Flash

In our recent article How To Make Money As A High End Wedding Photographer, we explored the high end wedding photography market.

But, it seems that the more I am able to charge for a wedding, the more complicated and stressful wedding photography becomes.

So recently I have decided that I would like to simplify my wedding photography a bit – get back to basics – unplug if you will.

how to photograph a wedding jp danko toronto commercial photographer

In this article I will take you through my simplified approach on how to photograph a wedding with just one photographer, one camera, one lens and one strobe.

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Build A DIY Slide Scanner For $10

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Example of the slide scanner by Barkergk

Here’s a quick DIY project that can help you convert your collection of old slide film collection into digital images by Instructables user, barkergk. The project calls for PVC pipe, a smartphone, and a few other items that can be easily sourced and the project itself shouldn’t take up too much of your time making it a great rainy day activity. Let’s get to it! [Read more...]

$7 DIY Diffusion Hack And Bonus Color Grading Tutorial All In Less Than 10 Minutes

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Film Riot is awesome. Where else can you go to learn how to make the world’s easiest DIY diffusion and get a free bonus lesson in color grading? We have them to thank for putting out this video clip that shows us how to save money by using a cheap shower curtain to diffuse lights for perfect lighting. And if that weren’t enough, they also let us join them for a walk through of their color grading workflow.
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When A Guest-With-Camera Saves The Wedding Photography

Have you ever knocked on the door of the bride’s suite on the morning of her wedding, camera in hand, ready to go – only to find some guest already there with a better camera than you? guest with camera wedding photography blur wedding studio hamilton wedding photographer

Well, this has actually happened to me on more than one occasion (which either says something about my gear or the confidence brides have in my abilities), but what happened this past weekend was unique.

Read on and I’ll share the story.

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[Strong Graphics] Big Ideas, Small Budget – How To Create Fun Conceptual Images On A Small Budget

Editor note. The post has some strong graphics in it which may not be to everyones taste. Proceed with caution.

Side Order

Photography can be an expensive passion; and none of us have the budget of a small European country although sometimes it does feel like we need it to create amazing images.  In this article I’d like to share some of my favourite conceptual images that were both fun and inexpensive to create.

Whilst I understand that my slightly dark and quirky style doesn’t suit everyone, you can take the basic ideas and techniques to apply to your own style.

For each concept I’ve given the price of the items I’ve used but keep in mind that you won’t have to buy everything every time for every shoot.  A little creativity goes a long way to keeping your costs down.

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How To Use Sound Sensors To Freeze Time And Motion

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Not to long ago, we showed you how to do a similar, but more budget-friendly, method of using sound detection to fire your shutter using a TriggerTrap and a Canon 600 EX-RT, but now let’s take a look at a slightly more expensive awesome way of doing it. Enter the Broncolor Scorro and a TriggerSmart sound trigger. Those two pieces of equipment paired with several softboxes and a some reflective black plexiglass and you’ve got yourself quite an impressive studio setup to help you get the job done. (Of course, shooting with a Hasselblad doesn’t hurt either.)

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