Build A DIY Slide Scanner For $10

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Example of the slide scanner by Barkergk

Here’s a quick DIY project that can help you convert your collection of old slide film collection into digital images by Instructables user, barkergk. The project calls for PVC pipe, a smartphone, and a few other items that can be easily sourced and the project itself shouldn’t take up too much of your time making it a great rainy day activity. Let’s get to it! [Read more...]

$7 DIY Diffusion Hack And Bonus Color Grading Tutorial All In Less Than 10 Minutes

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Film Riot is awesome. Where else can you go to learn how to make the world’s easiest DIY diffusion and get a free bonus lesson in color grading? We have them to thank for putting out this video clip that shows us how to save money by using a cheap shower curtain to diffuse lights for perfect lighting. And if that weren’t enough, they also let us join them for a walk through of their color grading workflow.
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When A Guest-With-Camera Saves The Wedding Photography

Have you ever knocked on the door of the bride’s suite on the morning of her wedding, camera in hand, ready to go – only to find some guest already there with a better camera than you? guest with camera wedding photography blur wedding studio hamilton wedding photographer

Well, this has actually happened to me on more than one occasion (which either says something about my gear or the confidence brides have in my abilities), but what happened this past weekend was unique.

Read on and I’ll share the story.

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[Strong Graphics] Big Ideas, Small Budget – How To Create Fun Conceptual Images On A Small Budget

Editor note. The post has some strong graphics in it which may not be to everyones taste. Proceed with caution.

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Photography can be an expensive passion; and none of us have the budget of a small European country although sometimes it does feel like we need it to create amazing images.  In this article I’d like to share some of my favourite conceptual images that were both fun and inexpensive to create.

Whilst I understand that my slightly dark and quirky style doesn’t suit everyone, you can take the basic ideas and techniques to apply to your own style.

For each concept I’ve given the price of the items I’ve used but keep in mind that you won’t have to buy everything every time for every shoot.  A little creativity goes a long way to keeping your costs down.

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How To Use Sound Sensors To Freeze Time And Motion

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Not to long ago, we showed you how to do a similar, but more budget-friendly, method of using sound detection to fire your shutter using a TriggerTrap and a Canon 600 EX-RT, but now let’s take a look at a slightly more expensive awesome way of doing it. Enter the Broncolor Scorro and a TriggerSmart sound trigger. Those two pieces of equipment paired with several softboxes and a some reflective black plexiglass and you’ve got yourself quite an impressive studio setup to help you get the job done. (Of course, shooting with a Hasselblad doesn’t hurt either.)

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From Shoot To Blog, What Is The Best Way To Get Your Images Looking Great (Also On Your Blog)?

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First thing….

Having a good workflow from camera to web is key. It should be noted that this workflow not a wedding workflow or a image heavy workflow and is one of the more expensive setups. I guess you could call this a premium workflow or a high end workflow. It is designed for photographers who are all about quality over quantity. If you are putting out 8-10 high end images per shoot, have paying clients, you have busy sets and pressure deadlines, this might be the set up for you.

Capture One (Capture) > Capture One (Develop) > Photoshop > Lightroom > SmugMug > WordPress

The interesting here is that each step is using the best program or tool.

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Put Your Old Calculator To Work As An Intervalometer With This Super Easy DIY Hack

The clever folks over at JCAP Media have found a way to turn your old TI-84 graphing calculator that’s been sitting in the bottom of your desk drawer since college into something you may actually use. Who knew the graphing calculator could double as an intervalometer just by inputting a few commands and attaching it to your DSLR? This little hack is super easy and could actually come in handy when you’re shooting your next timelapse. Check it out!

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Analyzing Light – How to Breakdown The Lighting Of A Photo

Ever since I started photography I had a thing  for lighting. Nowadays, every time I see a picture, I can’t help it but to analyze and breakdown how it was lit. In this article I will share my analyzing process, step by step.

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I believe understanding light can make a huge improvement to any photographer’s work, and practicing light-analysis is definitely one of the better ways to do it. When was just starting out, analyzing light on Flickr photos I love was a huge learning experience for me.

There are plenty of way (or tricks) to analyze light, this is how I do it, feel free to share yours too.

The first thing I do is break down the lighting into 4 hint-groups: Catchlights, Shadows, Highlights, and Background lights.

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Everything You Wanted To Know About Codecs And Why They Matter

If you’ve done any video work in your life, there is more than a slight chance that you were staring at Adobe Premiere (or Avid, Or Final Cut) export screen and drooling a bit while you were trying to understand what the heck all those dials on the screen mean.

David Kong just release what I would as the best primer to codecs I have ever seen.

David covers everything from what codecs are (compression and decompression); what is the difference between a codec and a container; what are the pros and cons of using each codec and touches a bit about his workflow.

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