The Harsh Truth About The Connection Between The Cost Of Your Gear And Your Value As A Photographer

harsh-truth

Posts that illustrate the cost of running a photography business and deriving an hourly (or a daily) rate from it are becoming somewhat of a standard. (We even did one ourselves, and here is another one). Those posts make a strong connection between the cost of doing business (renting a place, buying a camera and so on) and the fees that a photographer need to charge.

The team over at Salesographer makes what I think is a very true statement about the fact that the money you charge should have nothing to do with how much it actually costs to produce a shoot. It has everything to do with the value you bring to the table. They actually go right against those cost sharing posts and say that: [Read more...]

Daredevils Perform Stunts In The Holiest City In The World

von-wong-jerusalem-21

Every shoot is made from awesome scenery, awesome subjects and a solid concept to tie them together.  Photographer Benjamin Von Wong, Broncolor’s newest GenNEXT ambassador, teamed up with a few of Israel’s top sports extremists to produce an unconventional shoot against the walls of Jerusalem.

Having a low budget set meant gong for creative solutions when the location could not satisfy the vision that Ben wanted. Among these solutions were hanging on the rope from the old city walls and piggy backing Tomer Jakobson who was forced to meat a new interpretation to the phrase “supporting a shoot” [Read more...]

6 Things My Cat Taught Me About Photography

seamus-diyphotography-003

Okay– so, let’s be clear about something. He’s not actually MY cat. We happen to coexist in the same house, thanks to my wife and son convincing me in ways only they know how that it was time for a new pet and that he was just the pet we needed. Personally, I’m a dog person. Seamus and I, however, seem to have a love-hate relationship. As in we love to hate each other. Call it a restless detente. That may be overstating things just a bit, but this cat spends quite a bit of his time pissing me off. I actually believe he schedules it in some sort of kitty tablet (there’s an app for that). It wasn’t until recently, though, that I realized this havoc-wreaking creature that my son loves so dearly might actually be able to teach a thing or two about photography.

[Read more...]

11 Travel Photography Tips To Get You Through The Summer

travel-photography-tips-diyphotography-001

It’s summer once again and the fortunate among you will be hitting the road, hopping on planes, maybe even boarding a ship or two, and getting the hell out of Dodge for some hopefully stress-free rest and relaxation. Regardless of whether your travels are taking you around the world or just a day’s drive from home, it’s important to not only pack your camera gear carefully, but to also spend time putting some safeguards in place to make sure that you and your gear not only make beautiful travel photography together, and that you both get home safe and sound.

[Read more...]

The Amazing Photography Of Aerial Archeologist Klaus Leidorf

klaus-leidorf-11

German photographer Klaus Leidorf (Flickr) has a unique point of view on the world. It may be connected to the fact that he looks at it from above, riding a Cessna 172.

What started as a primarily archeological photography business, i.e. conducts archaeological surveys, turned into a passion when Leidorf joined Corbis as a contributing photographers and started selling photograph to academic publishers, newspapers, and a major insurance companies.

[Read more...]

Johannes Vermeer – A Photographer from 350 years ago

xl_music-680x779

350 years ago, Johannes Vermeer once painted a piece (pictured above) called The Music Lesson. What you’re looking at is something many people have considered impossible up to today; the light that shines through the windows in the painting is painted with exactly the same color that it has in real life when viewed through a projected image. It wasn’t being painted using a normal vision – it was being painted like it was a hand-made photograph. While many artists were indeed famous for implementing realism into their work even centuries ago, a painting this photorealistic has been though impossible to achieve up to even today. But for some reason, a painting like that exists, and Tim Jenison is a man who had a drive to find out how that was possible.

[Read more...]

An Introduction to Glitch Art: Implementing Digital Surrealism Into Your Photography

unnamed

One thing I love implementing in the work that I do is surrealism. When it comes to music production, for example, I like throwing in noises that catch me off guard. I might take samples of speeches and alter the voice of whoever’s speaking, and fit it into something as an introductory cut; vocoders are something I have too much fun with, if I don’t abuse them while experimenting with different sounds and figuring out what works best with what I’m writing.

Similarly, that form of surrealism is something I experiment with in photography to the point where it’s becoming something I generally implement into my work. One way I tend to mess with some of my photos is by giving them glitch distortions. If you’ve heard of this before, you’ve probably heard it referred to as “glitch art”. Glitch art’s gained a good amount of popularity since the turn of the millennium, around the time when digital photography started becoming popular. In the same way film has its imperfections illustrated through the little cracks and marks you see flashing by when a movie’s being projected (the “cigarette burn”, for example), digital work has its imperfections as well. The pixelization of a JPG, the compression of an uploaded mp4, or the complete chaos done to a video when it’s converted to an incompatible format – the digital age now has its own unique form of flaws, and it’s arguably a part of our culture up to today just because of the familiarity each of us have with the imperfections.

[Read more...]

How I Found My Vision

Genetically Identical – 2014 – Arroyo Grande, CA

Genetically Identical – 2014 – Arroyo Grande, CA

Why do I focus on Vision so much? It’s because I believe that Vision is what makes an image great. It’s what makes the difference between a technically perfect image and one with feeling. It’s what makes your images unique.

Great images do not come about because of equipment and processes, but rather from Vision that drives these tools to do wonderful things. What good are great technical skills if you don’t have an idea worthy of them?

If I had to choose between the best equipment in the world and no Vision or having a Kodak Brownie and my Vision… [Read more...]

The Cinematography of House of Cards

Skjermbilde-2013-03-17-kl.-11.33.26-920x3501

Last year, House of Cards received an Emmy Award in recognition for its cinematography, beating out Breaking Bad, Game of Thrones, and Mad Men.

Making its first appearance in 2013, House of Cards is the show that proved what Netflix is truly capable of, and its production was as different from everything else out there as Netflix was to other studios itself. I started watching this show a bit late, but right from the first scene of the pilot episode, I could point out how much David Fincher this show was running on; to my surprise, the director’s name greeted me twice in the opening credits.

So at the time of at release, this was almost downright unusual. Who could have guessed that a guy like David Fincher would be working as a producer and director for a show by a streaming service? Not only did this project have fincher on board, but it reunited him and Kevin Spacey, who served as a producer for the show as well as the leading role.

Whatever grabbed both of their attention was no big surprise. House of Cards has a story that’s right up Fincher and Spacey’s alley, and it’s exactly the kind of show that fans of Fincher’s past work could get into. Going into the cinematography of the show, I mention David Fincher for a reason: although he was mainly an executive producer, directing only the first two episodes, the tone that he set with them basically became the precedent for how the rest of the series would end up being filmed. The first person hired as the show’s cinematographer was Eigil Bryld, who filmed eleven episodes from the show’s first season.

[Read more...]