Open Letter To Client re: “Job Killer” Quoted Rate

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Hello Potential Client,

Regarding your last email in which you said:

“… if they (your client) saw the $700/ $1400 a day fee for the photographer they would dismiss the project immediately … (most of my client’s people make between $25 and $45 an hour)… Showing $100/hr was also a job-killer as you can imagine”.

Well sure thing. I see where you’re coming from… Let’s rewrite the quote to show the actual number of hours I will work on this job, instead of only those spent with my face in a camera. Maybe that will help.

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Direction, Cinematography, and The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

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Out of everything I’ve learned when it comes to photography, what strengthened my work the most was watching movies. Much of how I shoot my pictures today came from observing and comparing different directors and cinematographers. It’s why I started writing about film at all here in the first place – We’re not No Film School, but it’s still never a bad thing to learn from a good looking movie. Most of us are familiar with the concepts covering film direction and cinematography in general – but considering this is at heart a “DIY” blog, I thought it’d be cool to give a visual presentation on just how much both factor into the end result of a film. So let’s compare two relatively recent films that adapt the same source material: Stieg Larsson’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.

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Beautiful Macro Photos Of Spiders And Flowers Being Reflected In Tiny Drops Of Dew

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After browsing through the expansive (and insanely brilliant) portfolio of Italian photographer, Alberto Ghizzi Panizza, you might start to wonder how he always seems to be in the right place at the right time. His macro images are consistent perfectly timed feats of logic. But, as Panizza would explain, it’s not just good timing. After 10 years of practicing the craft, he almost intrinsically knows where to be when he wants to photograph insects, flowers, and peacock feathers as they are reflected into a tiny orb of morning dew that also just happens to be getting carried around by a spider. Needless to say, the photos are sublime. [Read more...]

10 Famous Landmarks You’re Not Allowed to Photograph for Commercial Use

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Having just returned from Paris, I spent some time photographing a few of the world’s most famous landmarks.

Some of these photos are just my personal vacation photos and will only be seen by me (and maybe my Facebook friends…DIYP readers…Facebook friends of DIYP readers…).  But, a few of them will end up being sold commercially as royalty free stock through my stock portfolio over at Stocksy United.

If you are a photographer, and especially if you are a commercial photographer (commercial in the general sense that you take photographs or sell photographs for money), you should be aware of the copyright restrictions for landmarks, buildings, architecture, art and other intellectual property.

Keep reading, because like this restriction on publishing photographs of the Eiffel Tower at night, there are more weird copyright restrictions for landmarks, buildings, architecture, art and other intellectual property than you might think.

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Vibrant Places All Around The World Brought To Life With Long Exposure

Capturing motion is in a photos that essentially freezes a moment in time is not trivial; We’ve shared works showing motion by literally freezing a high speed movement or by intentionally letting it blur. Matthew Pillsbury has a knack for capturing motion. He takes long exposure photos freezing all but the movement of people. In his recent photos, which are exhibited in Tokyo and New York, Matthew took photos of vibrant fast-paced urban areas of cities all around the globe. The results are hypnotizing.

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The Life Of A National Geographic Adventure Photographer: Jimmy Chin

JIMMY CHINIf you’ve always suspected that National Geographic photographers have awesome lives, this interview with Jimmy Chin might help prove your case. A team from Mashable traveled to Jackson, Wyoming to visit the NatGeo photographer in his home, offering us a glimpse into the adventurers’ paradise that is Chin’s storage and supplies room. (Holy cow does he have a lot of cool stuff.) It’s also kind of fun to see what Chin does in his downtime when he’s not skiing Everest or climbing Shark’s Fin on Mount Meru. Granted, he doesn’t get very much downtime with adventures of those proportions to partake in. Even when he is able to take a “break” from work, it seems as though Chin is always up to something epic. Seriously, the man is beast.

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This 40 Second Timelapse Of A Sunset Behind Mt. Torghatten Took 3 Years To Make

 

norway sunsetPatience doesn’t always come naturally to some of us, but as photographers it’s definitely a characteristic we should all possess. Take timelapse artist, Harald Warholm, for example. Had he not been determined and patient as a the year is long, we might never have been treated to the timelapse he just completed–3 long years after he started. Though The Sun In The Hole of Mt. Torghatten is only 45 seconds long (that’s short compared to most timelapse videos we share here) watching it, you begin to understand just why it took so long to complete. [Read more...]

How To Become A Pro Photographer In Four Steps

With the rise of digital cameras it is becoming increasingly easy to become a photographer. It is not enough to own the gear for the job anymore and you need to bring something extra to the plate.

With this in mind we shared a tongue in cheek post a while back demonstrating how you can become a wedding photographer in ten easy steps. It looks like satire facebook page Being Satan did us one over and is now sharing an easier way to become a pro in only four steps.

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Have you had a job taken by a pro photographer like that?

[via 9gag]

Revisiting Shinichi Maruyama’s “Nude”; 10,000 Photos Of Nude Dancers Composited Into One

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A well made photograph never gets boring to look at. As proven by the images that make up Shinichi Maruyama’s Nude series, which features gorgeous photographs of nude dancers. The photographs, however, are not your average studio shot and that beautiful display of the dancers motion wasn’t captured using long exposure techniques as you might suspect. Rather, Maruyama photographed the dancers using frame rates near 2,000 frames per second. In total, each individual image you see is actually made up of about 10,000 frames that were composited together during post production. [Read more...]