Tip: Shooting Fewer Frames Will Make You A Better Photographer

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How many frames do you take per shoot? One? Two? Fifty? Back in the days, film and developing was expensive so there was a price to each click. In today’s world clicks are cheap and a single frame no longer costs any money. This is why it is refreshing to see this tip coming from Hasselblad master Roman Jehanno.

It is a very simple advice: “shooting fewer frames will make you a better photographer“.

Roman says that the amount of pictures taken is counterproductive.

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For Tyler Shields Blowing Up A Rolls Royce Is Just Another Day At The Office

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Tyler Shields, the artist who made waves when his provocative Birkin Bag meets chainsaw project outraged fashionistas everywhere, is back at it, this time pulling at the heartstrings of luxury car lovers.

The Silver Shadow starts by showing an attractive and wealthy looking man carry a gas can across the desert to a beautiful lady standing next to an even more beautiful Rolls Royce. The shot gives the impression that the man is returning to rescue the lady by filling the swank ride up with a little gasoline, which it has appeared to perhaps run out of. But, then, no. He drops the gas can and the next thing you know the pretty lady is pouring the gasoline all over the exceptionally pretty car while the attractive guy pensively watches from the sidelines. [Read more...]

Supermodel Helena Christensen And Iconic Photographer Mary Ellen Mark Share Their Inspirations

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Mary Ellen Mark is a photographer who needs no introduction. She has been creating her remarkable portfolio of images since the 1960′s. Outside of her notable street photography work, she has also found herself photographing movie sets and countless publications such as Vanity Fair and Rolling Stone. Helena Christensen, a former Victoria’s Secret Angel and supermodel extraordinaire is also a talented photographer whose work you can find gracing the pages of Elle, Marie Claire, and Nylon magazines. [Read more...]

How X-Men: Days of Future Past Quicksilver’s incredible Slow-Mo Sequance Was Made

Have you seen X-Men: Days of Future Past yet? Even if you are not into science fiction that much, this is a wonderful movie to start with. It has a strong plot, good character building and (ok…) some mutants going back and forward in time…. (Ok, I’m a fanboy)

One of the most notable scenes in the movie has to do with a mutant called Quicksilver’s (Evan Peters). He is Marvel’s twin of DC Flash meaning he can move really, really fast. So fast actually, that it almost looks like bullet time…

In that specific scene Quicksilver has to get himself, Magneto, Wolverine and prof. Xavier out of a maximum security facility. Of course, this was the perfect chance to have some fun so Quicksilver knocks the hats off the security, makes them slap each other and tastes some of the food that is flying around. Wait a second.. Bullet Time? It may be quite interesting to see how they shot it.

Interestingly, it did not involve an array of cameras but a ton of CGI and a few huge fans instead.

[via wired]

New Timelapse Technique In Boston Layer-Lapse Shows Us Daylight In The Middle Of The Night

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Photographer and filmaker, Julian Tryba, is a big proponent of the do-it-yourself movement, having gone so far as to build a robot that follows people around and photographs them using information sent from their smartphones. But, that robot thing? It’s cool and all but, for Tryba that was college play. Now, he’s expanding his creativity through innovation by developing an interesting new way to edit timelapse footage. Drawing a little inspiration from Einstein’s relative theory, Tryba is using a technique he’s dubbed “layer-lapse” that’s similar to timeslice photography. [Read more...]

15 Common Mistakes People Make When Taking Photos And How To Fix Them

Regardless of skill level, we’ve all made at a least a few of these common photography faux pas. Even pros like Jeff Cable are guilty of a few, which is precisely why he’s here to share his experiences and advice on how you can recognize the mistakes as you’re committing them and what you can do correct it.

The clip is about an hour long, but don’t let that deter you. Jeff is an outstanding educator who knows how to keep it light, fun, and engaging. Watch the video here, then we’ll recap the list for you after the jump…

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Swoon Over The Masterful Photography And Video Editing In The Short Film “Watchtower Of Turkey”

watchtower1Equipped with a Panasonic GH3 and a GoPro 3, director and photographer, Leonardo Dalessandri spent 20 days exploring Turkey, travelling over 3500 km and documenting his experience along the way. The result is this incredible 3 1/2 minute long perspective of Turkey that handily trumps the stock footage travel videos that are oh-so-common these days.

Aspiring filmmakers should be taking a few notes as Dalessandri demonstrates his editing skills and post production prowess. Not to mention the wickedly brilliant sound design that went in to the short film with a little help via contributions from musician Ludovico Einaudi, and voice over actress, Meryem Aboulouafa. Watchtower Of Turkey is definately one you don’t want to miss! [Read more...]

Four Photographers Armed With A Hasselblad Take On The Streets Of Tokyo For A One Roll Of Film Challenge

 

one-roll-challengeWhat happens when you give a pro photographer a Hassleblad 503cx, a single roll of 120 film, and mission to tell the story of Tokyo in just 12 analog frames? Find out in this 18-minute behind the scenes look at the challenge where Mattias WestfalkBahagYoshiki Suzuki, and Paul del Rosario almost make it look easy. (It’s actually really difficult.)

The project may not sound like much of a challenge, as Westfalk points out in the opening scene, anyone can go out and shoot 12 frames, but to create 12 images worthy of printing is no walk in the park. The ease of digital photography and image storage allows us to fire off as many images as we like until we are happy with what we have, but ask any film photographer about their process, and chances are you’ll hear quite a different approach. Getting 12 usable photos from 12 frames of film takes patience, understanding, and a little talent and skill never hurt anyone, either. [Read more...]