How to Write a Photographer’s Bio…Or How NOT to

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I wrote a blog post yesterday explaining why I shan’t be attending a 2-day $1850 “business conference.” Read here.

I posted it on my Facebook page and someone replied, asking me what I think constitutes a GOOD bio. It’s a very legit question, so I put on my very legit thinking cap and wrote down my very legit thoughts on this very legit subject.

First, I think it’s important to understand WHY photographers do this with their bios- why they fill them to the brim with tons of personal details.

It’s done in an attempt to be relatable.

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How A 365 Day Project Helped Launch A Young Photographer’s Professional Career

857988_408400192587738_2059669835_oThree hundred sixty five day photography projects are tough. There’s got to be a high level of dedication and desire to improve. Time has to be made everyday to conceive an idea, take the actual photograph, edit, and post it in your journal. Birthdays, holidays, sick days–it doesn’t matter, there’s still a photograph to be made, no matter what. But, all of those things that make 365 projects seem so daunting, are a large part of what makes them so beneficial to one’s progress. And, when you’re as dedicated and talented as AlexStoddard, they can legitimately bring your photography game to the next level. [Read more…]

Hasselblad Developed This Manual to Train Astronauts How To Take Photos in Space

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We’ve seen a lot from NASA over the years, from original space exploration photos to intriguing experiments to some of the most incredible time-lapse footage you will ever watch.  Heck, we’ve even witnessed a moon landing Hasselblad go for three quarters of a million dollars!  But, we’re talking mere rocket scientists here, not esteemed photographers with an art school education.  So how does one go about training an under-qualified PhD to snap photos while on a road trip around the globe at 17,500 miles an hour?

Intent on proving that anyone can learn to take a picture, Hasselblad, presumably at the behest of the United States government, developed a comprehensive training manual for astronauts.  From specific instructions on operating the Hasselblad cameras to basic photography principles, astronauts were put through a crash course before going into space.  Here’s a look at the manual…

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Incredibly, Model Holds Breath for 4 Minutes to Shoot Underwater Video in a Single Take

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Holding my breathe for even a minute is a difficult task, let alone for four minutes straight.  And I can’t say that I’ve ever been tied up and sunk to the bottom of a pool.  But, for free diver Marina Kazakova, it’s all in a days work.

Lydia is a song about a failed relationship,” says Johnny Stevens of Highly Suspect, “and how it can be kind of tragic sometimes when two people’s life choices lead them in different directions but their love is still there.”  Apparently, drowning a woman was the best way to communicate that (said in all jest).

The incredible music video, brought to life by Pier Pictures, was shot a single 4-minute underwater take, during which Marina held her breath the entire time.  Now we get a look behind the scenes of how this inspiring film was created.

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The Evolution of Magazine Covers

Karen X. Cheng and Jerry Gabra take a look at how we’ve changed in the past 100 years

Cosmopolitan

Woah.

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click for a bigger version

Cosmopolitan covers started out with women dressed conservatively. Then they started showing some skin. Then more skin. Finally, they started posing in sexy positions.

As women have earned more rights throughout the years, they’ve also earned the right to wear whatever they damn well please. Or maybe that just sells more magazines?

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ISS Uses Still Camera and 800mm Lens to Demonstrate Acceleration Through Space

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In recent years we’ve become more familiar with the International Space Station (ISS) through live video feeds, experiment demonstrations, and fantastic images that have been brought back to earth.  (Then again, maybe it’s all just thrown together on some Hollywood sound stage…who knows.)  But, to the best of my knowledge, we have never before seen a camera used to demonstrate acceleration in space.

In this video, Commander Jeff Williams used a Nikon camera and 800mm lens to demonstrate the basic physics involved with moving through the cosmos.

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Watch How This Photographer Creates High-Action Images with Stroboscopic Flash

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Stroboscopic flash photography is basically putting your camera on a slow shutter speed and firing bursts of strobe lighting to freeze moments in action for a “double exposure image” on acid, so to speak.  When David Einar was booked for a shoot with the Linköping Hockey Club in Sweden, he wanted to convey the full sense of action embodied in the fast-paced game.  So he turned to the stroboscopic technique to create adrenaline action in these incredible images.

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Some Glitterbombs of Truth for Photographers

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  • If the photo you are posting to Facebook is the very top of a mountain, and that mountain is stealthy and cunning, it is a “Sneak Peak.” If it’s anything other than that, it’s a “Sneak PEEK.”
  • If you have to buy a pre-made photography workshop kit, you probably shouldn’t be teaching photography to others.
  • The hand that holds the camera will turn into a claw after a wedding. You will have a Lego Person hand. Don’t be alarmed by this.
  • Accepting a RUSH order is a lot like going into labor: while you’re in the middle of it, you swear you will NEVER do it again, but, sure enough, you do.

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Go On A Journey Around Los Angeles In This Twisting New Timelapse

timelapse-laI usually stray away from cities and all the hustle and bustle. Even when I’m just looking at photos and video, I find myself looking at landscapes of the great wide open much more often than I look at photos taken in urban and metropolitan areas. But, there’s something about this trippy timelapse from photographer and filmmaker, Vadim Tereshchenko, that makes me want to make a pit stop in Los Angeles next time I find myself on the west coast–even if it’s just long enough to ride that ferris wheel and catch a sunset. [Read more…]